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Why it doesn’t matter if InDenver Times succeeds or not.

Note: I’ve reposted this on fixjournalism.com.

I don’t care who you are. Whether you’re an experienced journalist, a cynical editor, a skeptical student, a hopeful professor…you stopped to think about what the death of the Rocky Mountain News meant when they announced that their last issue would publish on Feb. 27.

You probably watched their Vimeo (my heart broke a little when I saw the journalist buy a lottery ticket and  vow that he would buy the paper if he won) and downloaded the PDF copy of their front cover.

The day came and it ended. Newspapers closing isn’t a new story in America (see a full list of defunct newspapers here). It was time to move on and predict who was the next to go. The San Francisco Chronicle? The Seattle Post-Intelligencer (which has since stopped printing and is now online only)?

But part of the Rocky’s staff had a different idea.

They banded together, they found a few business executives who believed in their mission, they put together a makeshift Web site, they held a press conference and voila – InDenver Times was born.

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Why Twitter matters.

It seems like for the last few weeks, I’ve had to explain why I’m such a Twitter fanatic. While at the state legislature, a fellow reporter asked me to explain why Twitter was awesome to the president of the Nevada Press Association. At a SuperBowl party, I got into a debate with a fellow journalism student who thinks the application is useless and doesn’t understand why the fad is popular. One of my best friends (and yes, another journalism major) thinks that all the time I spend on Twitter is pointless.

What was the breaking point? I was reading a column from Time yesterday, and it irked it me when the writer said, “I can’t believe I’m saying this, but I’ve finally found something more stupid than Twitter.”

So I’ve finally decided to defend it on my blog.

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My Publish2 entry.

So there’s this contest I’ve decided to enter since it’s something I think about constantly: the “I Am the Future of Journalism” contest, being put on by Publish2.

The way it works is that you submit an entry where you can write text, create a video and a slideshow to convince people out there that you are the future of journalism. Then others get to decide if you made your point by voting for you.

It’s kind of interesting, because the person who wins gets a job with the company. That’s one way of doing it, right?

I doubt I’ll win or even make it the final 10 entries. After all, I’m one of hundreds of journalists, and all of these journalists have similar ideas.

But I figure I’ve got nothing to lose.

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An explanation (written from my desk at the ‘Brush)

It’s funny how quickly the word spreads.

During the last few days, people stopped me on the stairs, professors approached me before class and one person even got down on his knees at the state legislature and begged me not to leave.

And what would compel people to do this? Because I decided that I need a break from the Sagebrush.

Who knew people cared about what I did with my time?

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I’m going to start blogging about journalism.

The title of this blog, “Journalistic Rants and Raves,” has never actually lived up to its name.

But after recent decisions have changed the trajectory of my path (at least for a while), I will, as of this coming Monday, have more free time on my hands. In other words, I decided to take a temporary leave from the Sagebrush. And in even simpler terms, I quit.

This decision will be fully explained in a later blog post…I’m going to be good and stick to the title: blogging about journalism.

With the Sagebrush out of the picture for a while, I’m going to have a lot more time to figure out why I’m going into this business, and I plan on sharing those thoughts with the world – or rather, the two or so people who read this blog.

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Thoughts about my future in the journalism industry.

I like to think that I have a chance in this business. I like to think that when I graduate, someone will look at me and think, “Hey, that kid has potential. She’s worth taking a risk on.”
I read about layoffs at several news organizations. I read things like angryjournalist.com with posts from people who are disenchanted with this business. Just yesterday, I received a letter in my RGJ e-mail about how Gannett is laying off 10 percent of its newsroom staffs.
Despite all those things, I still keep trucking on.
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